English Romantic Poets: Wordsworth, Coleridge, Blake, Byron, Shelley, Keats.

English Romantic Poets: Lectures by Willard Spiegelman

24 lectures by Willard Spiegelman from the Teaching Company:

Poets included:

English Romantic Poets: Lectures by Willard Spiegelman:

Part I.

  1. Romantic Beginnings.
  2. Wordsworth and Lyrical Ballads.
  3. Life and Death, Past and Present [Wordsworth].
  4. Epic Ambitions and Autobiography [Wordsworth].
  5. Spots of Time and Poetic Growth [Wordsworth].
  6. Coleridge and the Art of Conversation.
  7. Hell to Heaven via Purgatory [Coleridge].
  8. Rivals and Friends [Coleridge and Wordsworth].
  9. William Blake: Eccentric Genius.
  10. From Innocence to Experience [Blake].
  11. Blake's Prophetic Books.
  12. Women Romantic Poets.

Part II.

  1. "Mad, Bad, and Dangerous to Know".
  2. The Byronic Hero [Byron].
  3. Don Juan: A Comic Masterpiece [Byron].
  4. Shelley and Romantic Lyricism.
  5. Shelley's Figures of Thought.
  6. Shelley and History.
  7. Shelley and Love.
  8. Keats and the Poetry of Aspiration.
  9. Keats and Ambition.
  10. Keats and Eros.
  11. Process, Ripeness, Fulfillment {Keats].
  12. The Persistence of Romanticism.

Part I of English Romantic Poets: Lectures by Willard Spiegelman

See also Poems of Part I.

1. Romantic Beginnings Poems of Part I

2. Wordsworth and Lyrical Ballads Poems of Part I

3. [Wordsworth] Life and Death, Past and Present Poems of Part I

4. [Wordsworth] Epic Ambitions and Autobiography Poems of Part I

5. [Wordsworth] Spots of Time and Poetic Growth Poems of Part I

"Throw out your Prozac; pick up your Wordsworth."

6. Coleridge and the Art of Conversation Poems of Part I

7. [Coleridge] Hell to Heaven via Purgatory Poems of Part I

8. [Coleridge and Wordsworth] Rivals and Friends Poems of Part I

9. William Blake: Eccentric Genius Poems of Part I

10. [Blake] From Innocence to Experience Poems of Part I

11. Blake's Prophetic Books Poems of Part I

12. Women Romantic Poets Poems of Part I

Part II of English Romantic Poets: Lectures by Willard Spiegelman

See also Poems of Part II.

13. [Byron] "Mad, Bad, and Dangerous to Know" Poems of Part II

14. [Byron] The Byronic Hero Poems of Part II

15. [Byron] Don Juan: A Comic Masterpiece Poems of Part II

From my own reading of the poem, these are its 16 completed cantos (sections), each canto averaging well over 100 stanzas; Byron had no overall plan for the entire work when he wrote the first Canto, so it is no surprise that it does not hang together as would a fully planned work:

	
	    But the fact is that I have nothing plann'd,    
	Unless it were to be a moment merry,
	A novel word in my vocabulary.	

Canto I (1818). Don Juan (16 years old) in Seville develops an affair with Julia (23), initiated (Byron and Juan like to claim) by Julia. A bedroom farce, though Julia is sent to a nunnery. while Juan's mother sends her son to sail the world.
Canto II (1818-19). Juan sails, tormented by his love for Julia, from Cadiz with servant and a tutor. The chapter is a horror of seasickness, storm, shipwreck, cannibalism, madness, and Juan's eventual landing on an island in the Cyclades. Haidée discovers Juan, nurse him hidden in a beach cave, falls in love with him, and (while her pirate father is away) marries him.
Canto III (1819). Byron satirizes his contemporary Lakes Poets, William Wordsworth's work, Robert Southey, and Samuel Taylor Coleridge's "Kubla Khan" and "Christabel".

The subsection the Isles of Greece in a different format (6-line stanzas) is more musical and serious than anything else in the poem, praising Greece and grieving for its loss of glory under the Ottoman Empire:

	The isles of Greece, the isles of Greece!
	    Where burning Sappho loved and sung,
	Where grew the arts of war and peace,
	    Where Delos rose, and Phoebus sprung!
	Eternal summer gilds them yet,
	But all, except their sun, is set.
	
	...
	
	The mountains look on Marathon --
	    And Marathon looks on the sea;
	And musing there an hour alone,
	    I dream'd that Greece might still be free;
	For standing on the Persians' grave,
	I could not deem myself a slave.	

Canto IV (1819). Haidée and Juan wake to discover that Haidée's father has returned to overcome Juan. Haidée dies. Her father sells Juan into slavery, and he is taken to market in Istanbul, Turkey.
Canto V (1820). Juan in the slave market talks with an enslaved Englishman, John. A eunuch buys Juan and John, and takes the them to the palace, where he requires Juan to dress as a woman. Juan is brought to the sultana (26), who had required his secret purchase.
Canto VI (1822). Juan, in woman's dress, is taken to the crowded seraglio. He shares (as a 'woman') the sleeping couch with one of the girls who (no surprise) wakes up everyone with a scream. In the morning, the sultana is furious that Juan 'slept' in the seraglio, and orders for Juan to be drowned.
Canto VII (1822). Juan and John escaped with two women. They arrive at the (1790) siege of Ismail, where the Danube enters the Black Sea. A Russian army office attacks the fortress. John and Juan join the Russians.
Canto VIII (1822). Juan and John scale the walls to conquer Ismail. Juan rescues Muslim girl (10 years), adopts her, and is sent to Russia (Petersburgh) as he hero with the girl.
Canto IX (1822). Juan becomes a favorite of Queen Catherine II.
Canto X (1822). Juan falls ill because of the cold in Russia. He is sent to England for its 'warmer' weather, where he is supposed to make negotiations for Catherine.
Canto XI (1822). Juan reaches London. He is mugged by a man that he shoots and kill. In this Canto, Byron comments on William Wordsworth's work, Robert Southey, and others. His comment on John Keats, although sympathetic of Keats' potential, erroneously attributes Keats death to suicide (which had happened to Chatterton):

	John Keats, who was kill'd off by one critique,
	    Just as he really promised something great
	If not intelligible, without Greek
	    Contrived to talk about the Gods of late,
	Much as they might have been supposed to speak.
	    Poor fellow!  His was an untoward fate;
	'Tis strange the mind, that fiery particle,
	Should let itself be snuff'd out by an article.	

Canto XII (1822). Juan lives in London among persons of wit.
Canto XIII (1823). Juan at a banquet at the home of a colleague.
Canto XIV (1823). Juan at a fox hunt and in further flirtations with ladies.
Canto XV (1823). Juan (like Byron) seems seductive to ladies in large part because he is in no hurry to seduce. Also like Byron, Juan admits that the women that he is attracted to are mostly already married. Another dinner with ladies.
Canto XVI (1823). A ghostly experience where Juan prowls the home of his host, looking for ladies.
Canto XVII (1823 and incomplete; Byron died 1824). As a defense of Byron and Juan, lists great people who were outsiders and revolutionaries.

16. Shelley and Romantic Lyricism Poems of Part II

17. Shelley's Figures of Thought Poems of Part II

18. Shelley and History Poems of Part II

19. Shelley and Love Poems of Part II

20. Keats and the Poetry of Aspiration Poems of Part II

21. Keats and Ambition Poems of Part II

22. Keats and Eros Poems of Part II

23. [Keats] Process, Ripeness, Fulfillment Poems of Part II

24. The Persistence of Romanticism Poems of Part II

The Romantic poets influenced:

Poems of Part I of English Romantic Poets

  1. Romantic Beginnings.
  2. Wordsworth and Lyrical Ballads.
  3. Life and Death, Past and Present [Wordsworth].
  4. Epic Ambitions and Autobiography [Wordsworth].
  5. Spots of Time and Poetic Growth [Wordsworth].
  6. Coleridge and the Art of Conversation.
  7. Hell to Heaven via Purgatory [Coleridge].
  8. Rivals and Friends [Coleridge and Wordsworth].
  9. William Blake: Eccentric Genius.
  10. From Innocence to Experience [Blake].
  11. Blake's Prophetic Books.
  12. Women Romantic Poets.

Poems of Part II of English Romantic Poets

  1. "Mad, Bad, and Dangerous to Know".
  2. The Byronic Hero [Byron].
  3. Don Juan: A Comic Masterpiece [Byron].
  4. Shelley and Romantic Lyricism.
  5. Shelley's Figures of Thought.
  6. Shelley and History.
  7. Shelley and Love.
  8. Keats and the Poetry of Aspiration.
  9. Keats and Ambition.
  10. Keats and Eros.
  11. Process, Ripeness, Fulfillment {Keats].
  12. The Persistence of Romanticism.
    None

Books


The Ecology Footprint quiz

As the Romantic Poets are poets of nature, this is your opportunity to take The Ecology Footprint quiz: calculate what is your own impact on Gaia.

Population Connection's Reporter (Winter 2004) gives:

  1. The average American ("Eusan") footprint is over 10 hectares (25 acres).
  2. The worldwide average footprint is 2.4 hectares (6 acres), which exceeds the available acreage.
  3. "Prof. David Pimentel estimates that the Earth can support from one to two billion people with a U.S. standard of living, good health, nutrition, prosperity, personal dignity, and freedom."

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